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Space Oddity – Chris Hadfield

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“The future is already here. It's just unevenly distributed.”
~ William Gibson, Neuromancer

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A 1988 Mixtape By Kurt Cobain

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“The future is already here. It's just unevenly distributed.”
~ William Gibson, Neuromancer

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What is the Outernet? (infographic)

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“The future is already here. It's just unevenly distributed.”
~ William Gibson, Neuromancer

Don’t know how to get Bitcoins? Go here: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Main_Page

US Election Day is November 4th

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“The future is already here. It's just unevenly distributed.”
~ William Gibson, Neuromancer

Don’t know how to get Bitcoins? Go here: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Main_Page

AP Exclusive: Ferguson no-fly zone aimed at media

(from bigstory.ap.org)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government agreed to a police request to restrict more than 37 square miles of airspace surrounding Ferguson, Missouri, for 12 days in August for safety, but audio recordings show that local authorities privately acknowledged the purpose was to keep away news helicopters during violent street protests.

On Aug. 12, the morning after the Federal Aviation Administration imposed the first flight restriction, FAA air traffic managers struggled to redefine the flight ban to let commercial flights operate at nearby Lambert-St. Louis International Airport and police helicopters fly through the area — but ban others.

“They finally admitted it really was to keep the media out,” said one FAA manager about the St. Louis County Police in a series of recorded telephone conversations obtained by The Associated Press. “But they were a little concerned of, obviously, anything else that could be going on.

At another point, a manager at the FAA’s Kansas City center said police “did not care if you ran commercial traffic through this TFR (temporary flight restriction) all day long. They didn’t want media in there.”

FAA procedures for defining a no-fly area did not have an option that would accommodate that.

“There is really … no option for a TFR that says, you know, ‘OK, everybody but the media is OK,'” he said. The managers then worked out wording they felt would keep news helicopters out of the controlled zone but not impede other air traffic.

The conversations contradict claims by the St. Louis County Police Department, which responded to demonstrations following the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown, that the restriction was solely for safety and had nothing to do with preventing media from witnessing the violence or the police response.

(keep reading at bigstory.ap.org)

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“The future is already here. It's just unevenly distributed.”
~ William Gibson, Neuromancer

Don’t know how to get Bitcoins? Go here: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Main_Page

The Day Israel Attacked America

(from aljazeera.com)

In 1967, at the height of the Arab-Israeli Six-Day War, the Israeli Air Force launched an unprovoked attack on the USS Liberty, a US Navy spy ship that was monitoring the conflict from the safety of international waters in the Mediterranean.

Israeli jet fighters hit the vessel with rockets, cannon fire and napalm, before three Israeli torpedo boats moved in to launch a second more devastating attack. Though she did not sink, the Liberty was badly damaged. Thirty-four US servicemen and civilian analysts were killed, another 171 were wounded.

Later Israel apologised for what it claimed to be a tragic case of mistaken identity. It said that it had believed the ship to be hostile Egyptian naval vessel. US President Lyndon Johnson was privately furious but publicly the White House chose not to challenge the word of its closest Middle East ally and accepted that the attack had been a catastrophic accident.

However, as this exclusive Al Jazeera investigation reveals, fresh evidence throws new light on exactly what happened that fateful day – and the remarkable cover up that followed.

(keep reading at aljazeera.com)

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“The future is already here. It's just unevenly distributed.”
~ William Gibson, Neuromancer

Don’t know how to get Bitcoins? Go here: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Main_Page

Cypherpunks, Bitcoin & the Myth of Satoshi Nakamoto

(from cybersalon.org)

As a movement, Cypherpunk is more nuanced, more serious and more focused than Cyberpunk. Like all good punk movements, Cypherpunk is radical by design and fanatical in its end goal of disrupting the status-quo. If we couldn’t see Cypherpunk clearly before it was because books like Cryptonomicon were not as accessible as the pulpy and instantly attractive Neuromancer.
Cypherpunk is concerned solely with hidden meaning, secrets and power that can be wielded out of sight from governments and spooks. It is embodied by discrete arrays of public/private key pairs. It is a science that values discretion and privacy above all else, and as such it champions our most closely held secrets and beliefs.
Cyberpunk by contrast was typified by Jaron Lanier’s clunky Virtual Reality: pixelated polygon aesthetics from the 1990s and William Gibson’s dystopian sprawl culture, but until now, we couldn’t really understand Cypherpunk’s issues as a culture, because we couldn’t imagine what Google would to do us or to our businesses. We didn’t know what ‘big data’ was, or how social networks would assimilate our friends, acquaintances and close family members into one amorphous communicative membrane. Neither could we envision how peer-to-peer networks might threaten Hollywood and Wall Street.
When Neuromancer was originally published in 1982 we couldn’t even get our heads around what a web browser was. Cyberpunk in the 1990s was all techno music and wild hair, squat parties and bad video art. Cypherpunk, by contrast was RSA, PGP and the NSA. Now, it’s BTC, GCHQ, PRISM, SHA-256, TEMPORA and RAGTIME-P (Stellar Wind). It’s a world full of acronyms and codes, impenetrable to all but the most cynical, distrustful, and political of minds.
In literature, those who are lost to history are occasionally referred to as ‘ciphers’. It’s a peculiar use of the word because it implies that the person is a lost word or code in the logos, not understood in their time. The root of the word is from the Arabic ‘sifr’ meaning zero, empty; so Satoshi Nakamoto, the inventor of Bitcoin is the historical “cipher-punk” par excellence.
This meaning of ‘cipher’ does not apply to our historical luminaries. Rather than benefiting from an absolute right to privacy, luminaries belong uncomfortably to the public domain where they suffer an element of transparency. This is a crucial point to understand because the Cypherpunks do not wish fame, exposure or recognition. Their philosophy can be summed up simply by Assange’s essential maxim: ‘Privacy for the weak, transparency for the powerful’.

(keep reading at cybersalon.org)

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“The future is already here. It's just unevenly distributed.”
~ William Gibson, Neuromancer

Don’t know how to get Bitcoins? Go here: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Main_Page